Part 4: Load testing the messaging integration style

In this four part series we have been looking at how different application integration styles handle spikes in load. In Part 1 we created and deployed a distributed system that used an RPC-based integration style. Our inventory application communicated with our purchasing application via a web service. In Part 2 we simulated a spike in load and caused the system fail. In Part 3 we updated the architecture from an RPC-based integration style to a messaging-based integration style. In this post, we are going to simulate the same spike in load and see how the messaging-based architecture copes.

Where are we now? We have updated our distributed system to use messaging as the communication mechanism between the applications. We have created an integration test that causes the inventory application to request stock replenishment from the purchasing application and we have created a load test that executes the integration test a thousand times and records the results. We have already tested our previous, RPC-based architecture and seen that it doesn’t hold up when there is more load than the hardware can handle. Read More…

Part 3: Re-architecting the system to use a messaging integration style

In this series of posts I am taking a practical look at how a messaging architecture can mitigate the risks associated with a spike in load if a server doesn’t have enough resources to handle the spike. In Part 1 I created a distributed system for a fictitious company. The system consisted of two nodes: an inventory node and a purchasing node. These nodes were integrated using an RPC-style architecture. In Part 2 I put the system under stress using a Visual Studio Load Test and saw how it failed when the virtual machine on which the purchasing system was deployed didn’t have enough resources to handle the load. In this third post I am going to use a messaging integration style over RabbitMQ to allow this distributed system to effectively handle spikes in load. Finally, in Part 4 I am going to simulate the same spike in load and see how the messaging architecture comfortably handles the spike. Read More…

Part 2: Load testing the RPC-based integration style

In Part 1 of this series I created a fictitious distributed enterprise system that allowed an inventory application to communicate with a purchasing application through an RPC integration style. In this post, I am going to give this distributed system a stress test, see how it fails and examine the consequences and severity of such a failure. In part 3 and 4 of the series I’ll take a different integration approach and update the system to integrate using a messaging style over the RabbitMQ messaging technology.

The test environment

As a reminder, this is how my distributed system is deployed:

Deployment Diagram

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Part 1: Creating a distributed system

I have recently been delving into the exciting world of distributed systems. From an architectural standpoint, distributed systems demand a different design approach than that of regular centralized applications. From a development standpoint, they provide a host of new and fun toys to play with. I have spent the last few months investigating some of the architectural styles and patterns associated with distributed systems. I have also been playing with some of the technologies used to implement these styles and patterns.  Read More…

Any website that allows users to create their own textual content requires a good text editor. Fortunately for today’s developer, there are many options available that provide users with a great text editing experience. Depending on the development platform, this is often as simple as plugging in an existing editor written for that platform. In early 2014 I was looking for just such an option for AngularJS. This tutorial will give you an overview of the steps I went through to add a text editor to my AngularJS application.

AngularJS is quickly becoming s a popular web application framework. Its scalable, modular structure and intuitive syntax make it a popular choice for building medium to large web applications. While AngularJS is certainly opinionated, its opinions turn out to be quite helpful – especially to those less nuanced in the intricacies of well-organized JavaScript. I found AngularJS, and its accompanying opinions, a pleasure to work with. Read More…

Video has become an integral part of our web experience.  This, coupled with the pervasiveness of connected and video capable devices, calls for an easy-to-use, flexible, reliable and scalable platform for hosting, processing and distributing media to anyone, anywhere, on any device.  The availability of Windows Azure Media Services (WAMS) Preview lets us explore a promising new platform which aims to bring us closer to that goal.  

Since WAMS is still in the preview release stage there are a few wrinkles in the platform that early adopters need to be aware of.  These issues should be corrected in upcoming releases but until then, there are a few alternate approaches that will help you get your media solution up and running with as little frustration as possible. In this post I will show you how to get video content hosted, encoded and delivered using the WAMS SDK and how to work around some of the quirks with the June 2012 Preview version.

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