While it isn’t quite as good as having complete control of your CSS, Dynamics CRM (2015 Online Update 1, and On-Prem 2016) now offers a feature called Themes. Themes enable the organization to customize their CRM Web interface to some degree, although we still don’t have complete control of the styling.

There are plenty of good blogs on Dynamics CRM themes, but I’ve yet to find one that includes good tips on determining the hex values for the colors you need. This blog will help you determine these values, including using a color picker to pull a color’s hex value from an image. Read More…

sharepoint 2013 logoIf you’ve ever had the need to add document management capabilities for your entities in CRM, you already know that CRM 2013 and CRM online rely on SharePoint for this functionality. This out of the box integration point is well documented and available for configuration in the CRM administrative interface. When set up, users can create, upload, view and delete documents in SharePoint locations that correspond to entity instances in CRM.

This post will discuss a different integration point – using search in SharePoint 2013 to expose CRM entity data. When setup properly, SharePoint 2013 can provide a robust, enterprise level search capability that can be tailored to your needs. Also, it seems to fill a current functionality gap in CRM that often requires a third party tool. Granted, you will need SharePoint 2013 Enterprise to realize this setup, but if this is available to you there should be no need to look anywhere else for search. Read More…

Dynamics_crm_logoRecently, I worked on a project that required me to programmatically set up Field Security in Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011. Field Security allows you to designate selected fields (of selected entities) to be “secure” – which means only a certain group of users can have access to it. This access is made up of three operations: read, update, and create, each of which can be granted separately. MSDN does a pretty good job giving an overview of how it works: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/gg309608(v=crm.5).aspx   Read More…

Attachments, Notes, and Annotations

How do you handle document storage and management in CRM? While this is a prominent feature in SharePoint, it is not as obvious or as easy to use in CRM. However, if you have a need to attach and manage documents in CRM, there is a provided option.

CRM offers a Notes field that can be turned on and associated to any entity. This Notes field is actually a reference to an entity called Annotation. The Annotation entity holds your file attachment and a reference ID back to the entity that the attachment belongs to. This feature is turned on by default for some of the default entities, but you need to turn it on yourself for custom entities.  Read More…

Microsoft Dynamics CRM is an interesting and powerful business application. A core out-of-the-box (OOTB) benefit of Dynamics CRM is the ability to extensively tailor the application to address business needs, and here there are two approaches to consider: development or customization. Determining which approach to take is the key to maximizing the benefits of Dynamics CRM while keeping costs low.

Dynamics CRM is a basic web user interface fronting a SQL Server database that manages relational data. However, it is flanked by a built-in array of basic analytical tools and extensive administrative features, such as auditing, which give it enterprise-level credentials. Throw in a customizable user interface (UI), and you have a tool that is capable of supporting both small businesses and multinational corporations. So it would be logical to assume that Dynamics CRM has a developer-friendly, structured architecture to support customizations.

However, the reality is a little more complicated and brings up some curious paradoxes about Dynamics CRM. Read More…

2013 was a great year for AIS — we worked on exciting projects for our terrific clients, built some cool apps and won some cool awards. We were honored with the 2013 Microsoft Mid-Atlantic Cloud Practice Award and are among the first Amazon Web Services partners to earn a “SharePoint on AWS” competency. And throughout the year, we wrote and blogged about our passion for cloud computing, SharePoint, going mobile, and doing “more with less” for our government and commercial clients.

Here’s a round-up of 2013’s most popular posts and series, in case you missed them:

We have big plans for the blog for 2014 — more posts, more events and more compelling content from the entire AIS team. Stay connected with us on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn, and check out our Events page for details on our free presentations and webinars.

Happy holidays, and thanks for reading!

Microsoft has revamped its licensing model for Dynamics CRM 2013.  Here’s a summary of the information from the latest Microsoft documentation.

There are three basic versions of Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2013, and each has its own particular licensing requirements:

  1. Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2013 On-Premises: Most useful for organizations that do their deployments in-house.  You must purchase a license for each server that will run the CRM Server software.  You must also purchase Client Access License (CAL) for each user or device that will access the software.
  2. Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2013 Online: Used for solutions that will be hosted in the cloud. You must purchase a User Subscription License (USL) for each user that will access the solution. USLs are assigned to a named user, which means that USLs cannot be shared. A single USL licenses the user to access any instance of Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2013 or earlier associated with the same tenant.  (USLs do not include use rights for Yammer or Skype.)
  3. Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2013 SPLA: Used by service providers and independent software vendors who license CRM to provide solutions to customers. You must purchase a Subscriber Access License (SAL) for each unique individual user who is authorized to access or otherwise use the licensed products. SALs are assigned to a named user, which means that SALs cannot be shared. A SAL will authorize a user to access any number of instances of CRM 2013 or earlier running on the organization’s servers. Read More…

My decision to join AIS six years ago was a revelation. After almost seven years spent working as an embedded IT analyst for various government customers, I joined AIS to support a customer who was implementing SharePoint.  I soaked up everything I could about this (at the time) brave new world of SharePoint. I loved it.

SharePoint 2003 had been available for use in my previous office where I had initially set up out-of-the-box team sites for working groups to support a large department-wide initiative. I found it empowering to quickly set up sites, lists and libraries without any fuss (or custom coding) to get people working together. Working with my new team, I gained insight into what we could do with this tool in terms of workflow, integration and branding. It got even better when we migrated to SharePoint 2007.  We made great strides in consolidating our websites and communicating to those who were interested exactly what the tools could do in terms of collaboration and knowledge management.

This ability for a power user to quickly create a variety of new capabilities exposed a deeper customer need – easier communications with IT.  While we had all this great expertise and firepower to create and maintain IT tools and services, our core customer base did not have an easy way to quickly and reliably communicate their needs in a manner that matched their high operational tempo. It was a problem. We needed a way for our customers to quickly and easily communicate with us in order to really hear what they needed to meet their mission goals and work more effectively. Read More…

Software development is a risky endeavor, with many things that can go wrong. At any moment, you may find that your budget or schedule targets have been completely missed and your developers and customers disagree about the scope and functionality of the project. In fact, numerous studies state that up to 60% of projects completely fail or massively exceed their budgetA recent study by McKinsey found that on average, most software projects over $5 million exceed their budget by 45%, turning that $5 million application into a $7+ million application.  As responsible software systems developers, we have to constantly ask ourselves – how do we prevent this from happening to our projects?  The answer is to reduce risk. Read More…