Microsoft PowerApps and Flow have been generally available since late 2016. They’re both tools that allow business users to streamline business processes without the use of code. Microsoft positioned PowerApps as their recommended replacement for InfoPath as the business user’s forms designer, and Flow as their replacement for SharePoint Workflow.

While these are welcomed replacements, both solutions also provide a broader level of support to the Microsoft stack and across a wide array of third-party applications.  I’ve recently been working with PowerApps and Flow to replace some internal applications, as well as to build proof-of-concepts for our existing clients. Here’s what I think of each, both separately and when putting them together… Read More…

2017 was another great year overall here at AIS, and also marked the fifth anniversary of our blog! We hope you enjoyed reading and found our posts helpful and interesting. We’re all pretty passionate about what we do here, and look forward to sharing more thoughts, insights and solutions in 2018 and beyond!

As we close out the year, here are the top 10 most read and shared blog posts of 2017:

1) Office 365 Groups vs. Microsoft Teams by Jason Storch

2) Lift & Shift: Migrating Legacy Applications to Azure Cloud by Nasir Mirza

3) Dockerization of Azure PaaS (Beyond Azure Container) by Vishwas Lele

4) Managed Images in Azure (Create & Deploy) by Justin Baca

5) Building Stateless Microservice Using Microsoft Service Fabric Series by Kasi Srinivasan

6) Azure PaaS Options: When to Use What? by Vishwas Lele

7) A three-way tie (!) for Parts One, Two & Three of Automated Deployments with Azure Resource Manager Templates, Azure Automation, & Octopus Deploy by Harun Davood

8) It’s Time to Review the Failure Modes of Your #cloud App(s) by Vishwas Lele

9) Pattern Matching vs. Deep Learning by Vishwas Lele

10) A Fix for the SharePoint Search Query/Result Mismatch by Clint Richardson

Happy New Year to all our readers and bloggers! Be sure to follow AIS on Twitter, Facebook or LinkedIn so you’ll never miss a post.

It’s another great day at Microsoft Inspire at the D.C. Convention Center! Lots of great sessions and keynotes are coming up today, but here’s a glimpse of some of the sights and sounds from yesterday! Read More…

Over the years, AIS has leveraged “Excel on Server” to enable power users to develop their own code.

Consider a common requirement to implement calculations/reports that adhere to the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) standards. These types of reports are often large and complex. The calculations in the reports are specific to a geographical region, so a multi-national company needs to implement different versions of these calculations. Furthermore, over time these calculations have to be adjusted to comply with changing laws.

Traditionally, these calculations have been implemented using custom code, and as a result, suffer from the challenges outlined above, including the high cost of development and maintenance, requirements being lost in translation, the lack of traceability, and the lack of a robust mechanism for making a quick change to a calculation in response to a change in a standard. This is where the power of Excel on Server comes in.

As you may know, Excel on the server is available via in two forms: Read More…

With the recent release of Microsoft Teams, you may be wondering what the differences between Teams and Office 365 Groups are. At AIS, we’re always on the forefront of the latest Office 365 services, and given our long-time partnership with Microsoft, we’ve actually been using both Microsoft Teams and Office 365 Groups for while now. We’ve gotten a solid sense of what both services are good at and what they’re…not so good at. At least not yet. Read More…

If you need managed services to maintain peak IT network operations, consider us here at Applied Information Sciences. We’ll manage all your IT services for a predictable cost so you can focus on more strategic investments. AIS’ Managed Services Practice provides ongoing responsibility for monitoring, patching and problem resolution for specific IT systems on your company’s behalf.

Capabilities

  • Patching
  • Monitoring
  • Alerting
  • Backup and Restore
  • Incident Response

AIS’ Managed Service Practice has up to 24×7 coverage for initial responses to incidents through a combination of dedicated, part- and full-time staff, both onshore and offshore. AIS prides itself in being on the leading edge of managed services support. Our collaborative, disciplined approach is committed to quality, value, time and budget. Read More…

powerappsIt all started with an email from a customer: They wanted an event app for an upcoming regional sales summit. The requirements fit the mold of a typical event app (session schedule and downloadable documents, photo sharing, surveys, sync with Outlook, etc.), but there was one small problem. The app needed to be done in less than a week.

Fortunately, we knew exactly what tools to use and how to put them to work for our client.

Read the rest of the story, and find out exactly how we got the job done, over at the Microsoft PowerApps Blog.

SharePoint Fest

AIS is EXCITED to sponsor SharePoint Fest – DC on April 27-29th.  Join other SharePoint practitioners from around the DMV to attend technical classes and workshops – taught by Microsoft Certified Trainers, Microsoft engineers and Microsoft MVPs – covering Enterprise Content Management, Power Users, Social SharePoint, Business Value, Implementation/Administration, Office 365, Workflow, Business Intelligence, Special Topics & SharePoint Development. Choose one complete learning track or mix & match based on what content best meets you and your organization’s current needs!

Seven Great Reasons to Attend SharePoint Fest – D.C.:

  • The technical classes and seminars at SharePoint Fest are focused on practical techniques and practices you can put to work today!
  • Our expanded three-day SharePoint conference allows for more topics and additional expert speakers from the community!
  • Get answers to your questions in the classroom, or as you mingle with speakers and peers at coffee breaks or at the evening cocktail reception!
  • Bring a group of developers, IT pros and business teams to improve your whole organization’s skills – and get a discount to boot! Contact us for group registration discounts!
  • Attend the SharePoint sessions that work best for you. With more than 80 classes and workshops to choose from, you can make SharePoint Fest your own custom SharePoint training event.
  • See how the Microsoft SharePoint ecosystem is growing and evolving by speaking with technical experts from the local Microsoft field and diverse channels within the Microsoft Partner Network all in our exhibit hall!
  • Learn from the brightest minds in the SharePoint universe! Many of our speakers are either Microsoft engineers or have achieved Microsoft MVP or MCM status based on their in-depth knowledge of SharePoint.

Register today and remember to use coupon code Applied25 to save 25% off.

Screen Shot 2015-12-09 at 1.21.26 PMWith the abundance of JavaScript libraries and frameworks available today, it’s hard to decide what is going to work best for a certain requirement. Add in the fact that there are many server-side tools that can also accomplish the task and you could spend hours just narrowing down options to test before deciding on the path you’ll take in the end. This was a recent conundrum for me when approached to incorporate child data management in the parent forms on a SharePoint 2010 project. My experience with JavaScript has been limited over my career because I’ve been so focused on the backend of SharePoint during the majority of that time. My current client has need for a better user experience, so I’ve been trying to fill that hole in my skills.  This project offered an opportunity to do just that.

While it’s possible to put an ASP GridView control in an Update Panel, a client-side approach seemed cleaner and a way to expand my JavaScript skills. I looked at many options like JQuery Datatables, koGrid, and a few others, but they didn’t give me the look, price (free), and/or TypeScript definitions for me to easily take off with implementing it.

I decided to build my own solution since it would be a relatively simple design and it would let me dig into KnockoutJS. In addition, it would be easier to use TypeScript to build an easier-to-maintain solution since it incorporates many of the ECMAScript 6 features like classes and modules, among others. Read More…