Visual Studio Team Services (VSTS) – formerly known as Visual Studio Online – is a SaaS offering of Visual Studio on Microsoft’s Azure platform. At its heart, the service is the cloud implementation of Team Foundation Services. Two of the service’s features, Continuous Integration and Release Management, were leveraged by AIS for a large federal client as part of a broader push for more streamlined DevOps practices.

Continuous Integration (CI) is a development practice where developers can integrate their changes into a shared code repository, which in turn triggers an automated build. This allows the development team to be quickly notified of any problems or errors caused by the checked-in change. VSTS’s Release Management Service allows developers to automate their deployment pipelines across any environment and platform – more than just .NET applications. For our federal client, the goal was to automate the entire continuous integration and release process for an ASP.NET Web API hosted in an Azure Web App. Since the client already had a subscription to VSTS, it was very straightforward for us to implement the entire solution within that one service. Read More…

With the explosion of new sensors and service offerings producing geospatial telemetry, there’s an ever-increasing need for tools to gain business insights from this data. One of the premier tools for this in the geospatial domain is GeoServer.

Fully open-source and free to use, GeoServer provides Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) web service interfaces to rendering images or complete metadata in most common geospatial interchange formats. In a consulting capacity, Applied Information Sciences has leveraged Geoserver with great success, allowing us to deploy a complete software stack in minutes instead days or weeks. In this post I’ll give an overview of the DevOps practices we’ve applied to enable this capability, as well as a brief overview of the supporting technologies. Read More…

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Make no mistake, most organizations and government agencies are—at least in part—software companies. The backbone of the services and products they sell, the internal business processes they use, and the customer feedback mechanisms they rely on are all built on software. Even in the age of software as a service (SaaS) – a modern organization’s portfolio of applications and the specifics of how these apps are used influence its most important decisions.

So while it’s easy to understand that software is a foundational component to modern business, often the decision to invest in building or offering software to users must also be accompanied by a more specific, anticipated return on that investment. That process can go like this:
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The Seamless Hybrid Cloud

27525399 - open window on white wall and the cloudy skyModern cloud computing offers enterprises unprecedented opportunities to manage their IT infrastructure and applications with agility, resiliency, and security, while at the same time realizing significant cost savings. The ability to rapidly scale up and down in the cloud opens countless doors of possibility to use compute and storage resources in innovative ways that were not previously feasible.

But getting to the cloud and managing both cloud and on-premises resources can be a daunting challenge. As a recent Gartner article explains, a Cloud Strategy is a must for organizations. That’s where we at AIS can help – we have years of experience and successes working with enterprises to develop a cloud strategy. We have the resources and expertise to then plan and execute, leveraging the latest technologies and best practices.

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Bridging the Divide With DevOps

DevOpsDevOps is the latest catchphrase that everyone claims to be doing.

Gartner recommends that “leaders wishing to create a significant, lasting impact on IT performance should look to move beyond the Bimodal paradigm in the space of months rather than years.” Leading and executing on this cultural change is very challenging in enterprise IT. The urgency is to ensure your line-of-business teams remain engaged with enterprise IT, rather than deepening the divide between infrastructure operations and application development teams. In today’s rich marketplace for cloud-based solutions including infrastructure, platform, and software as services, application teams and line-of-business customers have options beyond traditional enterprise IT operations for hosting their solutions. Read More…

In Part 1 of this blog series, we outlined the case for a Service Catalog driven approach for Enterprise DevOps. At AIS, after having worked with several of our Enterprise clients with their DevOps journey, we harvested our learnings in the form of a fully managed service catalog – AIS Service Catalog. AIS Service Catalog is a Microsoft Azure focused SaaS offering that is designed to jumpstart your DevOps efforts by bringing you the benefits of the service catalog driven approach.

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A Service Catalog for Microsoft Azure

In Part 1 of this blog post series, we identified four key features of a Service Catalog that are fundamental to establishing DevOps in an enterprise. Let us briefly talk about how AIS Service Catalog realizes these features using Microsoft Azure specific building blocks. Read More…

 By now, DevOps is well-established within web companies, unicorns, and product companies—and especially among companies targeting the cloud. To spare you the lengthy introduction, DevOps brings “development” and “operations” together as a moniker for company-wide collaboration that will improve business agility. The key DevOps traits are:

  • Involving Ops teams in early stages of development
  • Focus on automating all aspects of the IT life cycle
  • Continuous improvement
  • Maturity of self-service model

Enterprise DevOps Challenges

Despite its success within smaller companies, implementing DevOps in large enterprises has proven to be more difficult. Rachael Shannon-Solomon writes in The Wall Street Journal that DevOps is perhaps better suited for startups at the current time than for enterprise IT. Regardless of whether you agree with her article, it does raise some important points related to siloed structures, organizational change and affecting cultural change on a large scale.

The issue is not that enterprises aren’t adopting DevOps (just look at the latest State of DevOps report for evidence to the contrary); it is the unique set of challenges that large enterprises face that make it harder for DevOps to succeed. Let’s take a closer look: Read More…